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Feet

Feet. Hello, everyone! After the magazine post about hands, could we pass up a post about feet? Of course not.

So, now let’s talk about another absolutely fundamental part of our bodies. Where would we get without them? Not far. Still, feet are often neglected and even vilified.

How many expressions about feet are negative? Whether we have “cold feet” or a “foot in our mouth,” it’s never good!

But today we want to show you some beautiful and oh-so-useful feet, like those of saints like Saint Anthony of Padua in the late 15th-century painting by the Ferrara painter Cosmè Tura.

Cosmè_Tura
Cosmè_Tura

Relaxed feet, stretched on the sand, the work of Giorgio De Chirico, master of Metaphysical Art and the neoclassical feet with a slightly bored air about them from the opening photo.

Giorgio_De_Chirico
Giorgio_De_Chirico

Paintings of antiquity often lingered on this body part and all the more on footwear. We see some beautiful footwear, from the refined shoes of nobles and prelates

feet_refined_shoes
Feet_refined shoes

to the more modest feet of a Franciscan friar.

Franciscan_friar
Franciscan_friar

We have everything from the shoes of ancient Romans by the neoclassical painter Giovanni Muzzioli (Modena 1854–1894)

Feet
Feet_ancient_Roman

to the boots with cowboy-esque spurs by the Roman painter Agostino Masucci (Rome, 1691–1758).

Agostino_Masucci
Agostino_Masucci

Of course, there are the lovely buckled shoes of a painting by the Venetian painter Giacomo Favretto (Venice, 1849–1887).

Giacomo_Favretto
Giacomo_Favretto

At the completely other end of the spectrum is the suffering expressed by the muddy boots in the painting by Michele Cammarano, a painter from the early 20th-century Neapolitan school.

Michele_Cammarano
Michele_Cammarano

We are moved by the shabby pair of shoes belonging to the madwoman in the painting by the great Futurist artist, Giacomo Balla (Turin, 1871- Rome, 1958) at GNAM.

Giacomo_Balla
Giacomo_Balla